Belief in multiple Gods of Ancient cultures
Star Beings Gods and Sky Spirits
Connection between Native American Gods and Planet-X?

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The Gods and Goddess's of Native American Indian Cultures

American Indian Gods and Goddess'sNative American Indian "folklore" or "mythology" consist of oral legends and tales of Star Beings or Sky Gods and can be harvested from the American Southwest to the great white north of Canada to Tierra Del Fuego.

In story-telling traditions dating back to antiquity, the gods once descended from heaven to impregnate barren females in remote villages. Mothers bearing these strange seeds would then nurture and raise the "Star Children" until the age of six or thereabouts, when the gods would return to reclaim their progeny, leaving villagers staring up into the infinite night.

Many Native American tribes have stories and histories concerning the sky beings sometimes referred to as Thunderbirds. In some cases, these powerful beings act as teachers, guardians, and law enforcers and most always conveyed the importance of balance in all things.

Native Americans, New Agers, and charlatans alike have radically augmented and revised the tenets of traditional Native American religions. "Crystal skull caretakers" sit beside Native American medicine men and medicine women, shamans and priests, and "Star Beings," rather than buffalo, are pondered. Outraged Native Americans have entered this fray, castigating those they see exploiting traditional Native American spirituality.

Popular American Indian Star Beings and Sky People

Pawnee Indians - aka Star People

Native American Sky Gods The seemingly simplistic astronomical observational tools used to observe and determine the motions of the Moon, stars, and planets would have appeared extremely sophisticated to the Pawnee Indians living on the Great Plains of Nebraska a century ago. They were skillful sky watchers.

Proof of their observational activities resides in the Pawnee collection at the Chicago Field Museum of Natural History. Discovered in one of the Pawnee "Sacred Bundles" groups of ceremonial objects wrapped together was a star chart. The chart is made from a piece of tanned elk skin, oval in shape, and approximately 38 cm by 55 cm in size. Its exact age is uncertain, but it is thought to be between 100 and 300 years old.

The importance of the sky chart to their culture was considerable, important enough to be included in a sacred bundle. Every Pawnee household had a sacred bundle, which they believed were gifts from the stars, whom they considered to be supernatural beings who often descended to Earth to maintain relationships with mortal people.

One major Pawnee legend deals with the origin of the sacred tribal bundle, which was guarded and protected by the tribal shaman for its magical charms. The bundle could be used to invoke the aid of the Great Spirit in bringing buffalo to the tribe in times of hunger.

The stars and constellations were a great influence on almost every aspect of their lives, and even their houses were laid out in patterns which duplicated the patterns of the constellations, indicating the positions of their most important star gods.

Apache Indians - Gahe

Star Beings The Gahe, also Ga'an are Supernatural beings who dwell inside mountains. The can sometimes be heard dancing and beating drums. Because they can heal and drive away disease, they are worshipped.

In the ritual dances of the Chiricahua Apache masked dancers painted a different color for each point of the compass represent all the Gahe except the Grey One. The Grey One, though he appears as a clown, is really the mightiest of all the Gahe.

Arikara Indians - Nesaru Sky Spirits

The Nesaru had charge over all creation. Displeased with a race of giants in the underworld who would not respect his authority, Nesaru sent a new race to the underworld to replace them and sent a flood which destroyed the giants without destroying the new men. When the new men cried out to be released from the underworld, Nesaru sent the Corn Mother for their deliverance.

Zuni Indians - Achiyalatopa

The Zuni are a North American Indian people that speak a Penutian language living in western New Mexico. In Zuni mythology, Achiyalatopa is a celestial giant monster with feathers of flint knives
petrographs of indian sky gods

Cherokee Indians - Geyaguga Moon Spirit

The Cherokee (more properly Tsallaki) are a north American Indian nation of the Iroquois family with two main divisions: the Ottare and the Ayrate. In Cherokee mythology, Geyaguga is an all powerful, magical spirit that descends from the moon.

Navajo Indians - Mythical Gods

The Navajo nation prospered from the Southwest of Arizona to the Great plains. In Navajo mythology, Hastsehogan is the god of houses.
Hastseltsi is the god of racing
Hastsezini is the god of fire

Iroquois, or Six Nations Indians

petroglyphs of indian star spirits The Iroquois, were a confederation of North American Indian tribes including the Mohawks, Oneidas and Senecas.

In Iroquois mythology, Hino is the thunder god, guardian of the skies. Keneun is chief god of the Thunderbirds. He is an invisible spirit. Thunder is the sound of his beating wings and lightning his flashing eyes.

Ataentsic is the goddess of the earth. She was the Woman Who fell from the sky and creatress of the sun and moon. It is she who gives counsel in dreams.

In Iroquois mythology, the flying head was a giant winged head with fire for eyes, fangs like knives and wings of strands of hair. It preyed on animals at night, and when it found a human settlement it descended upon it and set on the farm animals and the owners. The flying head was destroyed after eating roasted chestnuts and the fire they were roasted in. Hey, how elese could a primitive species explain a flying craft? petroglyphs of indian star spirits

Pueblo Indians - Sky Spirits

In Pueblo Indian mythology, a kachina is a deified ancestral spirit with all powerful magic and ruler of all things.

The Hopi Indians

The Hopi indians, part of the Pueblo family, hold that every plant, animal and aspect of life and death is governed by a different kachina, which look after the welfare of the Hopi people. What do you suppose the references in Hopi mythology to mysterious "flying shields" of fire signify?

Two separate realms exist in the Hopi cosmology: the surface of the earth as the site of human activity and a combined sky/underground region as the home of the spirits, in particular the kachinas. (For the Hopi a kachina is a masked spirit that can assume the form of any physical object, phenomenon, or living being.)

Sioux Plains Indians

In Sioux mythology, Wakonda is the Great Spirit who keeps the balance in the universe, revealing the great secrets to only a few favored shamans.

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missing link debate |  planet x - nibiru |  man killers |  quantum physics |  critical thinking  |  save your planet
demi god rule |  meet your creator |  meet god |  world timelines |  alien visitation |  religious terror |  2012 alert
sumerian warnings |  mayan predictions |  greek gods |  educate |  god wars |  true evil |  fleecing religions
maya countdown |  freaky news |  blog-a-licious |  kindness = godliness |  voice your opinion |  play time


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